7 Interesting Facts about Hawaiian Language

Jesu Priya | 26 - 07 - 2020
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All we know about Hawaiian culture and language is hula dancers and the well-known word “Aloha”. And it’s time to learn some more interesting facts about Hawaiian languages.

Facts about the Hawaiian Language:

Did You Know That Hawaii Is the Only Us State with Two Official Languages?

Apart from the native Hawaiian language which has been around since 1778 English is also an official language of the state of Hawaii. Both languages are now being taught in schools.

The Hawaiian Language Is a Polynesian Language

The Hawaiian language belongs to the Polynesian languages. Because Hawaii comes under Polynesia which includes all the 10,000 scattered islands over the central and southern Pacific Ocean.

1. What Are the 8 Consonants in Hawaiian Alphabet?
  • A. B, C, D, F, G, V, X and Z
  • B. L, M, N, P, Q, R, S and W
  • C. H, K, L, M, N, P, W, and ʻ
  • D. None of the above

How Many Letters Are in the Hawaiian Alphabet?

The Hawaiian alphabet used to have only 12 letters which is 5 vowels and 7 consonants. But currently, it consists of 13 letters, the same 5 vowels but 8 consonants, making it much easier than English but some words are difficult to pronounce because it’s longer than usual.

Secrets in the Hawaiian Alphabet

Hawaiian words may start with any letter but always end in a vowel and every consonant is always followed by a vowel and the syllables in their words consist only one or two letters, never longer.

The True Meaning of Aloha

Most people still think that “aloha” means hello and goodbye but “aloha” also means living with love, peace, affection, compassion and kindness with everything around you.

How Many People Speak the Hawaiian Language?

During the 18th century, the native Hawaiian language speakers spoke the English language. Only 0.1% of the Hawaiian population spoke their native language but favorably now more than 20,000 people speak it at native speaker level.

Once It Was Illegal to Speak Hawaiian Language in Hawaii

After the colonization of Hawaii as a territory of the United States in 1898, the Hawaiian language was banned from schools and government. But in 1986 after much struggle, the prohibition was officially lifted.

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