Everything about Magpies, Superstitions, and Truths

Eliza | 17 - 12 - 2020
Everything about Magpies, Superstitions, and Truths

Superstition about MagpieIt is believed that magpies bring bad fortune. There is a saying that the magpie was the only bird not to go into the ark with Noah and instead the bird sat on top, swearing and chattering as the world drowned.

It is also said that it is the only bird not to sing to comfort Jesus on the cross and after his death it was the only bird not to enter a proper period of mourning. The magpie is known for thievery, because it steals shiny objects. People believe that magpie has some of the Devil’s blood and it is often associated with death through its habit of eating dead animals.  

Why Should You Salute a Magpie?

Which Bird Is a Symbol of Bad Luck?
  • A. OwlSong
  • B. Peacock
  • C. Songbird
  • D. Kingfisher

There is an old British rhyme which predicts your fate based on how many magpies you have seen. And some say that if you fail to salute a magpie, then it means bad luck waits patiently behind the next corner for you.

Few Amazing Facts about Magpie and Its Superstitious Beliefs:

  •    Magpies are always surrounded by superstitions and there are many rhymes that start with “One for sorrow, two for…”

One for sorrow,

Two for joy,

Three for a girl,

Four for a boy,

Five for silver,

Six for gold,

Seven for a secret never to be told.

  • In the past 35 years, the number of magpies in Britain and Ireland has been multiplied.       
  • During the winter time, magpie’s diet is completely vegetarian. In summer, predominantly ground invertebrates. And only during the spring, they become a predator hunting for their young ones, looking inside songbird’s nests for eggs.
  • Magpies look way bigger than they are. The tail makes up half the bird’s length. And its average weight is only about half that of a wood pigeon.     
  •  In some parts in Europe, magpies are the main prey for goshawks. And in Britain they don’t have much of an enemy other than humans.  

Read Next