You Can Scuba Dive in These 10 National Parks

Eliza | 02 - 11 - 2020
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What is scuba diving? Scuba diving is a mode of underwater diving, using a special equipment for breathing. ‘Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus’ (SCUBA) was developed in the mid 1940s by the world famous underwater explorer and conservationist, Jacques-Yves Cousteau.

 

National Parks with Great Scuba Diving:

How Many Scuba Divers Die Each Year in North America?
  • A. 101 people die in North America
  • B. 300 people die in North America
  • C. 100 people die in North America
  • D. 80 people die in North America

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

Dry Tortugas National Park

Divers find history above and below the ocean of Dry Tortugas national park. The park is known for dozens of wrecks for divers to explore and also has a variety of fish species and other sea animals.  The Dry Tortugas offers dive sites suited for all levels and have excellent natural light, good for underwater photographers.

Biscayne National Park, Florida

Biscayne National Park, Florida

Biscayne National park protects coral reefs, mangrove forests, Biscayne Bay and 10,000 years of human history. This is best for scuba diving too. The park borders the popular John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park and offers a quieter alternative.

Channel Islands National Park, Southern California

Channel Islands National Park, Southern California

In Channel Islands National park, Kelp forests and sea caves are extraordinary diving spots. The park covers five islands off the southern California coast Anacapa, Santa Cruz, San Miguel, Santa Barbara and Santa Rosa.

Olympic National Park, Washington

Olympic National Park, Washington

Olympic National park is located on the shore of northern Washington. It has the best freshwater diving, head to Lake Crescent which has a barge at 25 feet in pristine water that offers visibility up to 150 feet. And outside the national park is Salt Creek State Park. Visit Olympic national park for the best experiences.

Acadia National Parks, Maine

Acadia National Parks, Maine

It is best to visit Acadia national park in mid-July because it is the prime time. Geological forces have been shaping up this national park for about some 500 million years.

San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington

San Juan Island National Historical Park, Washington

San Juan Island National park is best known for its saltwater shore, quiet woodlands, orca sea whales and scuba diving. The divers of San Juan can swim through kelp forests to encounter some mesmerizing nudibranchs, giant Pacific octopuses and wolf eels.

Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska  

Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska  

Are you looking for ice water dives that allow you to see large fauna like orcas, it is possible at Kenai Fjords park. This national park located in Alaska covers more than 1,000 square miles and the best time to visit is May through August. According to the (NPS) National Park Service, this park is logistically “extremely challenging” for divers.

Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef Monument

Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef Monument

Deciding where to dive is the main problem for the diver of Virgin Island. The Trunk Bay Underwater Trail was among the first of its kind in the world and a variety of protected bays offer snorkelers to enjoy as well.

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

Montana’s Glacier National Park is one of the best places for scuba diving. The park is open year-round, though facilities can close in severe winter weather. The best time for diving is April to November, with midsummer water temps ranging from 60 degrees at the surface down to about 40 degrees at 100 feet.

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Yellowstone national park is largely located in Wyoming and some parts stretch into Idaho and Montana. It is best to visit Yellowstone national park in July and August month. It is one of the world’s largest altitude lake dives, covering almost 125 square miles more than 7,700 feet above sea level.

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